Sites to See Nearby

Vienna Gate 

Vienna Gate (Bécsi Kapu) at the northern end of Castle Hill. This was the market for non-Jewish merchants in the Middle Ages,and is where all four streets that run the length of the hill converge. The Vienna Gate inspired a typical Hungarian parental retort for children who talk back, they will be scolded with "Your mouth is as big as the Vienna Gate!" The gate is not really large or extraordinary, but you can climb over it anyway.

Mary Magdalene Tower

Mary Magdalene Tower (Mária Magdolna torony), on the corner of Országház utca and Kapisztrán tér is the part of a 13th-century Franciscan church used by Hungarian speakers. Under Turkish rule, this was the only church allowed to remain Christian: all others were converted into mosques. The chancel was destroyed in World War II and has not been rebuilt except for one stone window, as a memento.

Military History Museum 

The museum is situated in the north-western part of the Buda Castle district. Its main attractions include a remarkable collection of historical weaponry from before the 150-year Turkish occupation to the recent past; uniforms, maps, shells, flags, a coin collection containing about 28,000 items, also an exhibition dedicated to the recollections of Hungarian airmen who left Hungary after WWII. There is a special section displaying important facts about the 1956 Revolution.

  Matthias Church

The historic Matthias Church (Mátyás-templom) is over 700 years old. The church was the scene of several coronations, including that of Charles IV in 1916, the last Habsburg king. It was also the venue for the great Hungarian King Matthias' two weddings, hence its name.

Fishermen's Bastion 

Fisherman's Bastion (Halászbástya). This is the large white tower and lookout terrace complex you see hanging over the side of Castle Hill beneath the Mátyás Church. It was built between 1890-1905, and is named after both the medieval fishmarket once nearby and the Guild of Fishermen who defended this section of the wall during past wars.

  Arany Sas Pharmacy Museum

The building of the Arany Sas Pharmacy Museum had given home to the first pharmacy in Buda. Its original furnishings, along with a reconstruction of an alchemist's laboratory are on display, showcasing the history of medicine, along with Renaissance and Baroque pharmaceutics.

Labyrinth

The Labyrinth is situated in the complex of caves and cellars beneath Castle Hill. The underground labyrinth system served as a large shelter and hospital during World War II, but the Turks also used it back in the 16th century, mainly for military purposes. Remains dating back to the Turkish era confirm that part of the Labyrinth was also used as a harem. In the 15th century the Labyrinth gave home to a prison and it's most famous prisoner was Vlad Tepes, better known as Count Dracula, held in captivity by Hungarian King Matthias Corvinus. The underground labyrinth is about 6 miles long and the part, which can be visited, is one mile.

Hospital in the Rock

The Hospital in the Rock is a hospital created in the caverns under Buda Castle in Budapest in the 1930s, in preparation for the Second World War. The hospital was later re-purposed as a nuclear bunker. Now a museum, it is complete with waxwork recreations of hospital treatments and day-to-day scenarios during the siege.

Royal Palace

Royal Palace (Királyi palota) probably the most popular attraction on Castle Hill. It is unusual in that it has never actually been occupied by the Hungarian Royal family, and is more of a pseudo-historical mishmash, like the Mátyás-templom.

The first palace, in Gothic style, built and added onto over 300 years, was destroyed by the Christian army that liberated Buda from the Turkish occupation in 1686. In 1715 work started on a completely new, smaller Baroque palace, but over the years more and more space was added to the palace until it reached its current length (304 meters). The palace, in neo-Baroque style, had many added wings (which now house the National Gallery). Reconstruction after the various indignities suffered during rebellions of the nineteenth century finished in 1904. This reconstruction, by Miklós Ybl and Alajos Hauszmann, was undone by German troops holding out at the end of WWII. The roof fell in entirely and most of the furniture was destroyed. A Baroque façade which had never existed before and a real dome (there had previously been a faux dome with attic space beneath) were added to the building. Today the building houses three large museums) and the National Széchényi Library.

National Gallery

(within the Rpyal Palace)

The National Gallery (Nemzeti Galéria, in palace wings B, C and D) houses an astounding collection of paintings. For those interested in Hungarian artists, this is the museum to visit. The exhibition of nineteenth-century Hungarian paintings is most notable.

Budapest History Meseum  

(within the Royal Palace)

Budapest History Museum (Budapesti Történeti Múzeum) is dedicated to the history of Budapest. Archaeological items uncovered in various local excavations in Pest, Buda and Óbuda - the three cities which make up Budapest - are on display. The oldest finds date back more than 40,000 years. Unfortunately not many artifacts survived from the once famous medieval palace, however lower levels of the museum feature some remains and a modest selection of restored rooms. Finds from new and ongoing excavations keep adding new items to the collections.

Funicular

Offers great panoramic views and it's also a lot of fun. The Funicular (or Sikló, as it is called in Hungarian) first opened in 1870, and it was designed to provide a cheap commute for the clerks working in the Castle District. The Funicular has two stations, the lower station is at the Buda end of the Chain Bridge and the upper station is on Castle Hill, between Royal Palace and Sándor Palace.

(Sources: http://www.lonelyplanet.com; http://wikitravel.org; http://visitbudapest.travel; http://www.budapest.com)

SURVIVAL GUIDE (includes programme recommendations for kids)

We also prepared a Survival Guide in Budapest, which includes useful & important information as to the followings:

  • 3D MOVIE
  • AQUAWORLD
  • BASILICA
  • BOWLING
  • BUDAPEST ZOO
  • CHURCHES, WORSHIP
  • CONFECTIONARIES & PASTRY SHOPS
  • FLEA MARKETS
  • FOREIGN EMBASSIES IN BUDAPEST
  • GROCERY SHOP
  • HUNGARIAN RAILWAYS (MÁV)
  • MARKETS
  • MUSEUMS
  • OPERA
  • OPERETTA
  • PALACE OF ARTS (MÜPA)
  • PARLIAMENT
  • PARTY CLUBS
  • PHARMACIES OPEN 24 HOURS
  • PUBLIC TRANSPORT
  • RESTAURANTS & FAST FOOD
  • SHOPPING MALLS
  • SIGHTSEEING CRUISES BY BOAT
  • TAXI COMPANIES
  • THERMAL SPAS
  • TROPICARIUM

To download the document, please click here.